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  • Light Reading Series 9: Graham Ellard & Stephen Johnstone With Mike Sperlinger

    Light Reading Series 9
    Graham Ellard & Stephen Johnstone With Mike Sperlinger
    London Light Reading
    Wednesday 29 April 2009, at 7pm

    Light Reading’s ninth series continues with a dialogue between artists Graham Ellard and Stephen Johnstone and writer and assistant director of the LUX, Mike Sperlinger. Ellard and Johnstone will also present one recent work PROPOSAL FOR AN UNMADE FILM (SET IN THE FUTURE) (2007) and a new work in progress, MACHINE ON BLACK GROUND (2009).

    Ellard and Johnstone’s collaborative practice is a particular and highly subjective method of investigation into the conventions and effects of the representation of space in cinema. Their recent films start from stories or alibis they tell themselves about the buildings they encounter. Or sometimes the films start from a simple but perhaps far fetched or intuitive formal analogy of some kind that intimates another kind of use or function for the building entirely. These stories, alibis and analogies then form the basis of a kind of shooting and editing script in which a poetic movement from one image to another is as important as any sense of narrative development.

    Part of a trilogy, MACHINE ON BLACK GROUND employs archival as well as original footage, combining images from early 1960s industrial documentaries, a concert by Tangerine Dream at Coventry Cathedral and recently shot abstract material of modernist stained glass architecture to suggest a utopian architectural project viewed from an “imagined subterranean space or vantage point.” In so doing, the film proposes two simultaneous formal analogies which suggest that different elements that make up an architectural structure can also be seen to act as a priori structural frameworks for the cinematic event; i.e. stained glass as filmstrip and the modernist cathedral as projector of light.

    PROPOSAL FOR AN UNMADE FILM (SET IN THE FUTURE) explores the representation of architectural space whilst playing on a set of material and experiential dichotomies. The idea of a “proposal” stands for elements of pre-production; source material and audition footage, whilst simultaneously projecting itself into a retrospective state of discovery and its viewing as archival material. The film is set in the volcanic landscape of the Timonfaya National Park and intertwines shots of the utopian architecture of Cesar Manrique. The narrative that emerges is one that utilises cinematic convention and quotation in order to question the possibility of an objective placement of the work in time and the experience of architectural space it creates as a result.

    Graham Ellard and Stephen Johnstone have collaborated since 1993. They are currently included in the group show “In Search of the Unknown” at Montevideo/Netherlands Media Art Institute, Amsterdam. Other recent screenings and exhibitions include International Film Festival Rotterdam, Filmwinter Stuttgart, Oberhausen Short Film Festival, BFI Southbank, Cleveland Museum of Contemporary Art, Cleveland and the Chicago Architectural Foundation. www.ellardjohnstone.com

    Mike Sperlinger is assistant director of LUX and a freelance writer. He is the author of two books including “Afterthought: New Writing on Conceptual Art” (Rachmaninoff’s, 2005) and “Kinomuseum: Towards an Artist’s Cinema” (Kurzefilmtage Oberhausen, 2008). www.lux.org,uk

    Light Reading is an ongoing series of critical dialogues that engage artists, writers and curators around a selected artist’s body of work. To book or to be included on the mailing list for future events, please contact .

    at

    Light Reading
    3rd Floor, 316-318 Bethnal Green Road, London, E2 0AG
    Nearest Tube / Train: Bethnal Green

    Tickets: £5 door / £4 advance
    Telephone: 020 7729 4494
    Email: [email protected]
    Places are limited so booking is essential

    www.no-w-here.org.uk

    Category: 

  • EXPRMNTL - Knokke - May 3

    EXPRMNTL
    Curated by Xavier Garcia Bardon. Coordinated by Kevin Decoster.

    In the context of the Internationaal Fotofestival Knokke-Heist

    Sunday May 3, 2009
    13:00-20:00

    Casino Knokke-Heist
    Zeedijk-Albertstrand 509, 8300 Knokke-Heist
    Belgium

    EXPRMNTL is the most important event that has ever been organized for experimental cinema. This amazing festival (five editions between 1949 and 1974), organized in Knokke-le-Zoute in an empty casino between Christmas and New Year, was a key place for experimental film in the critical period of its development, and almost the only meeting point for avant-garde filmmakers for years, the place where experimental movements connected.

    But EXPRMNTL was way more than that: it remains a fascinating experience in the history of underground culture. As Jacques Ledoux, its founder and director (who was also the director of the Royal Belgian Film Archive) said: ‘The greatness of Knokke lies in its bringing face to face, not only film makers, but novelists, theatre people, painters, et al. There are not only screenings, but discussions, meetings; it is that which gives Knokke its true interest’. To connect people and ideas, to provoke unexpected meetings (with also an important social and political aspect), was the main project behind EXPRMNTL.

    In this isolated place, out of the world, people met, films were screened, happenings happened and scandals broke out: this is where Underground film came to Europe, where Jean-Luc Godard and Agnès Varda saw Jack Smith’s Flaming Creatures, secretly shown in a hotel room; where Yoko Ono did a naked performance with Jean-Jacques Lebel; where German students of the SDS (including Holger Meins, future member of the Rote Armee Fraktion, and Harun Farocki) demonstrated against experimental cinema. EXPRMNTL was an experiment in itself.

    In the historical context of the Casino, this programme featuring film screenings, live performances, talks and an exhibition of rare documents related to EXPRMNTL will discuss the history and importance of the festival. It will also offer a rare opportunity to visit the fantastic Magritte zaal - which is usually not open to the public - and to talk with the ghosts of Knokke-le-Zoute.

    Cultuurcentrum Scharpoord
    Meerlaan 32, 8300 Knokke-Heist
    [email protected]
    www.ccknokke-heist.be
    www.fotofestival.be

    *EXPRMNTL SCHEDULE*

    13:00 > 20:00
    Exhibition

    13:00
    Introduction by Xavier Garcia Bardon
    - The Big Shave (Martin Scorsese, USA, 1967, 6’)
    - 21/87 (Arthur Lipsett, Canada, 1963, 11')
    - Schwechater (Peter Kubelka, Austria, 1957-58, 2’)
    - Wavelength (Michael Snow, Canada, 1966-67, 45’)

    14:30
    - CHARLEMAGNE PALESTINE – live performance

    15:30
    - Line Describing a Cone (Anthony McCall, 1973, 30’)

    16:00
    - Le corbeau et le renard (Marcel Broodthaers, Belgium, 1967, 10’) introduced by Maria Gilissen.

    16:30
    - Unedited Material from the Star (John Latham, UK, 1960, 12’)
    - Talk Mr Bard (John Latham, UK, 1968, 7’)
    - Speak (John Latham, UK, 1968-69, 11’)

    17:00
    - Le Vampire de la Cinémathèque (Roland Lethem, Belgium, 1971, 24’). Live soundtrack by DOLPHINS INTO THE FUTURE. Introduced by Roland Lethem.
    - Flaming Creatures (Jack Smith, USA, 1963, 45’)
    - Ray Gun Virus (Paul Sharits, USA, 1966, 14‘)

    18:30
    - Pêche de nuit (Henri Chopin, Tjerk Wicky, Luc Peire, France, Switzerland, Belgium, 1963, 12’) introduced by Marc Peire.
    - Beatles Electroniques (Nam June Paik & Jud Yalkut, USA, 1966-72, 1992, 3’)
    - Towers Open Fire (Anthony Balch & William Burroughs, UK, 1963, 10’)

    19:00
    - Saturnus (Ludo Mich, Belgium, 1971, 30’) introduced by Ludo Mich.
    - LUDO MICH – live performance

    Category: 

  • Tank tv : Jacco Olivier 22nd July - 11th August

    tank tv. Now Showing: Jacco Olivier
    22nd July - 11th August 2009
    tank.tv is pleased to present a showcase of the work of Dutch artist Jacco Olivier.

    These short videos exemplify the dense painterly technique that has come to define Olivier’s work within the realm of moving image and position him somewhere between painter, filmmaker and animator. Each work is 'a slice of life' and the effect on viewing is of a feeling forgotten or a mystery unravelling. By withholding any meaningful narrative Olivier leaves viewers examining their own desire for meaning within these little, emotive pieces which seem like so much flotsam from the artist’s own experience.

    “The images he (Olivier) makes are obviously painterly, their brushwork bold and narrative, their colour-sense superb. Yet the point of painting is that it is framed, that it frames (or freeze-frames) a turning world. By contrast, Olivier’s frames do all of those transitory things we expect of film, so that you’re constantly longing to shout “Stop!”; to be given a moment to appreciate his individual visions. We expect different things of painting and cinema. By running the two together, Olivier shakes the way we see the world.” - Charles Darwent, The Independent on Sunday, 2007.

    tank tv. Now Showing: Jacco Olivier
    22nd July - 11th August 2009
    tank.tv is pleased to present a showcase of the work of Dutch artist Jacco Olivier.

    These short videos exemplify the dense painterly technique that has come to define Olivier’s work within the realm of moving image and position him somewhere between painter, filmmaker and animator. Each work is 'a slice of life' and the effect on viewing is of a feeling forgotten or a mystery unravelling. By withholding any meaningful narrative Olivier leaves viewers examining their own desire for meaning within these little, emotive pieces which seem like so much flotsam from the artist’s own experience.

    “The images he (Olivier) makes are obviously painterly, their brushwork bold and narrative, their colour-sense superb. Yet the point of painting is that it is framed, that it frames (or freeze-frames) a turning world. By contrast, Olivier’s frames do all of those transitory things we expect of film, so that you’re constantly longing to shout “Stop!”; to be given a moment to appreciate his individual visions. We expect different things of painting and cinema. By running the two together, Olivier shakes the way we see the world.”
    Charles Darwent, The Independent on Sunday, 2007.

    Category: 

  • Light Industry: Kevin Jerome Everson, May 18

    Light Industry
    Films by Kevin Jerome Everson
    220 36th Street, 5th Floor
    Brooklyn, New York
    http://www.lightindustry.org
    Monday, May 18, 2009 at 7:30pm

    Grounded in historical research and a strong sense of place, Kevin Jerome Everson¹s films and videos combine documentary and scripted elements with a sparse, rugged formalism. His ongoing subject matter is the lives of African Americans and other people of African descent, often working class, but he eschews standard realism in favor of strategies that abstract everyday actions and statements into theatrical gestures: archival footage is re-edited or re-staged, real people perform fictional scenarios based on their own lives, historical observations intermesh with contemporary narratives. His films suggest the relentlessness of everyday life?along with its beauty?but also present oblique metaphors for art-making.

    Many of his works return to Mansfield, Ohio, where Everson was born and raised. The community's past is examined in Company Line, in which city employee Curley Lanier explains why he and his family left Alabama in the late 1950s to migrate North: ³To do better?I guess.² The remarks betray a sense of deep ambivalence about the promises of upward mobility in America that runs through this collection of recent projects; fifty years later, the people of Mansfield still aren¹t sure what ³better² means.

    - Company Line, 2009, 30 mins
    - Lead, 2009, 3 mins
    - North, 2007, 2 mins
    - Second and Lee, 2008, 3 mins
    - Fifeville, 2005, 14 mins
    - Ike, 2008, 3 mins
    - Undefeated, 2008, 2 mins
    - The Reverend E. Randall T. Osborn, First Cousin, 2007, 3 mins
    - Home, 2008, 2 mins
    - The Wilbur, 2008, 2 mins
    - Two-Week Vacation, 2005, 1 min
    - Honorable Mention, 2009, 2 mins
    among others.

    Followed by a conversation with Everson and Michael Gillespie.

    Born in 1965, Everson now lives and works in Charlottesville, Virginia. Everson¹s artwork and films has been exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art in New York; the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Cleveland Museum of Art, the Studio Museum in Harlem; the Armand Hammer Museum in Los Angeles; Whitechapel Gallery in London; the Palm Beach Institute of Contemporary Art; Wurttenbergischer Kunstverein, Stuttgart, Germany; the Spaces Gallery in Cleveland; the American Academy of Rome in Italy, the Sundance Film Festival, Rotterdam International Film Festival, Cinematexas, Ann Arbor Film Festival, New York Underground Film Festival, and many other venues worldwide. He is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, a NEA Fellowship, two NEH Fellowships, two Ohio Arts Council Fellowships, an American Academy Rome Prize, residencies at Yaddo and MacDowell Colony and numerous university fellowships.

    Tickets - $7, available at door.

    About Light Industry

    Light Industry is a venue for film and electronic art in Brooklyn, New York. Developed and overseen by Thomas Beard and Ed Halter, the project has begun as a series of events at Industry City in Sunset Park, each organized by a different artist, critic, or curator. Conceptually, Light Industry draws equal inspiration from the long history of alternative art spaces in New York as well its storied tradition of cinematheques and other intrepid film exhibitors. Through a regular program of screenings, performances, and lectures, its goal is to explore new models for the presentation of time-based media and foster an ongoing dialogue amongst a wide range of artists and audiences within the city.

    About Industry City

    Industry City, an industrial complex in Sunset Park, Brooklyn, is home to a cross-section of manufacturing, warehousing and light industry. As part of a regeneration program intended to diversify the use of its 6 million square feet of space to better reflect 21st century production, Industry City now includes workspace for artists. In addition to offering studios at competitive rates, Industry City also provides a limited number of low-cost studios for artists in need of reasonably priced space. This program was conceived in response to the lack of affordable workspace for artists in New York City and aims to establish a new paradigm for industrial redevelopment--one that does not displace artists, workers, local residents or industry but instead builds a sustainable community in a context that integrates cultural and industrial production. For more information:
    http://www.industrycityartproject.org

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  • Experimental Film Club: T , O , U , C , H , I , N , G

    T ,O , U , C , H , I , N , G
    The Architectures Of Perception

    Cinematic enchainment & sentient machines
    Invited artist Maximilian Le Cain

    Sunday 25th January
    4pm / Doors: 5 Euro
    Ha'penny Bridge Inn (upstairs)
    Dublin

    This month’s programme looks at plastic, quasi-sculptural aspects of cinema as present in a series of correlated explorations of light, space and repetition. The starting point in selecting these films was Making a Home (2007), a video work by Cork-based artist Maximilian Le Cain, who also collaborated in curating this programme. The other films were selected for the various ways in which they resonate with and expand certain features present in Making a Home. In general terms, the films we are presenting (dis)articulate the structures of architecture, in the broadest and most perceptual sense of the word- space as it is objectively constructed (or dismantled), but also as it is experienced by the camera eye, by fictional characters and by the audience. Whilst each of the four films puts a different emphasis on one or more of these three centres of attention, they have in common that their drama is an individual subject’s direct perceptual experience of light, time and space, occurring at the extreme limits of his or her senses.

    - Making A Home (Maximilian Le Cain, Ireland, 2007, Video,  color, sound, 10 mins)
    - Leo es pardo (Iván Zulueta, Spain, 1976, 16mm on DVD, 12mins)
    - Chromo Sud (Etienne O'Leary, France, 1968, 16mm on DVD, 21 mins)
    - T,O,U,C,H,I,N,G (Paul Sharits, USA, 1968, 16mm, 12 mins)

    See the full programm here.

    Category: 

  • Expanded Cinema: History, Society, Technology

    Expanded Cinema: History, Society, Technology (Symposium)
    London Central Saint Martins
    Wednesday 22 April 2009

    Building on the conference "Expanded Cinema: Activating the Space of Reception" at Tate Modern (17-19 April 2009) this seminar will explore the social, historical and technological connections underpinning expanded cinema. The symposium will be followed by a programme of Australian film video and multi-projection curated by Sue.k.

    Speakers: William Raban (London College of Communication), Lawrence Daressa (California Newsreel), Lauren A. Wright (The London Consortium), David Erol Fresko Jnr (Stanford University), Chris Sams (London College of Communication), Rebecca Ross (Central St Martins & Harvard), Adam Kossoff (Wolverhampton).

    Please note that the Expanded Cinema Archive Video Library will be available to the public in the Tate Modern Starr Auditorium Foyer from 17-22 April 2009.

    Seminar Programme:

    10.30 am
    Session one will address the technological changes of avant-garde as well as mainstream forms of cinematic presentation and production and their effects on historical and contemporary interpretations of Expanded Cinema. 20-30 min illustrated papers will be followed by Q+A with the audience.

    David Erol Fresko Jnr (Stanford University)
    ‘Multiple-Image Composition in the Age Before Griffith’

    Chris Sams (London College of Communication)
    ‘Expanded Archive: Kubrick, Manovich, Kittler’

    Rebecca Ross (Central St Martins & Harvard)
    ‘All Above: Henri Giard's Ballon Captif at the 1867 Exposition d'Universelle’

    Adam Kossoff (Wolverhampton)
    ‘The Aesthetics of Technics’

    1 pm - Lunch Break

    2 pm
    Session two will look at the shifting social context of expanded cinema; a live form that seeks to situate and activate the spectator in many ways. 20-30 min illustrated papers will be followed by Q+A with the audience.

    Lawrence Daressa (California Newsreel)
    ‘Expanded Cinema as ‘Social Change Media’: California Newsreel since 1968’

    Lauren A Wright (The London Consortium)
    ‘Present: Context and Spectatorship in Expanded Cinema’

    William Raban (London College of Communication)
    ‘Structural Film: Expanded Cinema and Reflexivity’

    4.30 pm - Drinks Reception

    6.30 pm - FRACTURED LIGHT
    This programme of recent experimental film and video from Australia includes single and multi-screen work by Tobias Dundas, sue.k., Madeline Quirk, David Brian Short and Richard Tuohy. Curated by sue.k. Presented in association with cogcollective.

    at

    Innovations Centre Conference Room
    Central St Martins College of Art and Design, Southampton Row, London,
    WC1B 4AP
    Nearest Tube: Holborn

    This event is free but places are limited.
    To book, email Duncan White

    www.studycollection.co.uk
    www.rewind.ac.uk/expanded/Narrative/Home.html

    Category: 

  • Tank TV: The whole world

    The Whole World

    Curated by Ian White

    1st January 2008 – 1st March 2008

    tanktv_flowers1.jpg

    The
    Whole
    World
    is a list of lists: a programme of artists' film and video and an interactive online exhibition.

    Both a formal device and a political strategy,
    film and video that deploys a list as part of its structure often does
    so with political intent: to subvert hierarchies, to undermine
    rationalism or to reveal contradiction. In contemporary culture the
    pop chart's Top 10 has been replaced by an ever-expanding craze for
    "Top 100s" of everything from Hollywood genres to celebrity gaffes. The Whole World attempts to wrestle back

    the initiative…

    A selection of artists' film and video that
    feature lists or different kinds of taxonomies - visual, audio or
    textual – are presented as an online exhibition of extracts. Works by
    Dalia Neis, Uriel Orlow, Jean-Gabirel Périot, Michael Robinson and
    Valerie Tevere take as their subject such wildly diverse lists as
    depictions of saints, everything on Ebay, magazine advertising, our
    mediated world, protest, violence and war, the pages of National Geographic magazine and the words spoken by people on
    the streets of New York. Text scrolls across the
    screen, images flash past, immersive landscapes ultimately
    disintegrate. Many things are logged and something is undone.

    At the same time, viewers are invited to contribute to
    the
    programme by uploading their own video list, be that an extract from an existing work or something made specially for the purpose, to compile a unique, exponential collection: an extraordinary list of lists, of
    the world as we know it – the whole
    world
    .

    The Whole World is situated somewhere between
    the

    absurd and obsessive enterprises of Flaubert's eponymous characters
    Bouvard and Pecuchet (they hopelessly collect and explore until,
    exhausted, they revert to their original jobs as copy clerks) and the Japanese animated game Katamari in which players roll all matter – objects, buildings, landscapes,
    the
    world itself - into snowballing globes of stuff. The Whole


    World
    is ridiculous and irreverent, ambitious and viral.

    Programme
    Dalia Neis, Saints, 2005 / Jean Gabriel Periot, 21.04.02, 2002 / Uriel Orlow, Everything in Red, Yellow, Blue and Green, 2006 /
    Michael Robinson, You Don't Bring Me Flowers, 2005 / Valerie Tevere, When I Say / Valerie Tevere & Angel Navarez, Freque
    ncy Allocations / Martha Rosler, Semiotics of the Kitchen, 1975

    Submitted work will be selected to join
    The Whole World as well as
    tank.tv's programme on the CASZartscreen in Amsterdam.

    Category: 

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